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What’s New in Solid Edge 2019

John Pearson - Wednesday, June 20, 2018

 

Some of you may be asking “What happen to Solid Edge ST11?”. Siemens PLM has decided to adopt the year format, thus making the next release Solid Edge 2019. Products in the Solid Edge portfolio will also adopt this year format name change. For example, “Solid Edge Illustrations” will be named “Solid Edge Illustrations 2019”. This name change helps associate each Solid Edge release with a year as well as provide naming consistency across our portfolio of products.Longtime users will also notice other subtle changes such as:


Install location example:

 

C:\Program Files\Siemens\Solid Edge 2019

 

AppData location example :

 

C:\Users\[User Name]\AppData\Roaming\Siemens\Solid Edge\Version 219

 

Registry example :

 

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Siemens\Solid Edge\Version 219

 

 

The Splash screens have been updated to reflect the year-based naming.The primary license name has been added to splash screens.

 

 

 


 

 

The focus for Solid Edge 2019 seems to be the Solid Edge Portfolio. Siemens continues to expand their presence in the mainstream engineering market by adding additional affordable add-ons to compliment the powerful Solid Edge design package. This time out, they’ve added the following new packages:

 

Solid Edge Electrical – A best-in-class electrical package that includes:

  •  
  • Harness Design - Rapid and intuitive harness and formboard design tools with automated part selection, design verification, and manufacturing report generation allows engineers to quickly and confidently bring products to market.
  •  
  • Wiring Design - Wiring design and simulation tools for the rapid creation and verification of electrical systems allows design teams to overcome electro-mechanical design challenges earlier in the design cycle.
  •  
  • Electrical Routing - Efficiently create, route and organize wires, cables, and bundles using Solid Edge Electrical Routing. Links to Solid Edge Wiring and Harness Design tools, allows electro-mechanical design teams to create complete and accurate digital mockups, containing both mechanical and electrical components, removing the need for expensive physical prototypes.
  •  
  • PCB Design - Schematic capture and PCB layout tools, including sketch routing, hierarchical 2D/3D planning and placement, and ECAD/MCAD collaboration, simplifies the complex task of printed circuit board design.

 

This looks to be one of the highlights of this new release. This is a standalone package from Mentor (A Siemens Company), which can be connected to Solid Edge, allowing data exchange directly between Solid Edge and Solid Edge Electrical. Solid Edge & Solid Edge Electrical can be configured to work on either the same machine or a remote machine.

 


 

 

 

Solid Edge data management – Siemens PLM has enhanced what they previously called Solid Edge built-in Data Management and renamed it to Solid Edge data management. This provides a set of tools to help manage Solid Edge data with no additional purchases or installation. Although this data management requires no additional purchases or installation, it does require some setup. Companies that set this up should know that it is scalable to Teamcenter if their needs require this in the future.

 

 

Solid Edge Requirements Management – This is a portfolio offering for customers that cannot use Teamcenter, for whatever reason, but need requirement traceability. This is powered by Polarion, – a subset of SIEMENS-owned Polarion ALM (Application Lifecycle Management). This will allow customers to meet compliance mandates in aerospace, medical devices and other regulated industries. This does require an additional purchase, installation, and setup.

 

 

Solid Edge Portal – Free cloud-based collaboration. The Solid Edge Portal offers online CAD management, viewing, and collaboration—for free. With browser-based access for viewing and markup of CAD files, on any device, you can work in real time, from anywhere. Experience secure, controlled sharing of project documents and CAD files.

 

 

Solid Edge CAM Pro - A comprehensive, highly flexible system that uses the latest machining technology to efficiently program your CNC machine tools, from simple NC programming to high-speed and multi-axis machining. Associative toolpaths for parts and assemblies speed design changes and updates. Solid Edge CAM Pro is powered by NX, and replaces the NX Cam Express, but maintains all its functionality, and more.

 


 

 

Sticking with improving the Solid Edge Portfolio, Siemens has enhanced some of the following packages:

 

 

Solid Edge Modular Plant Design – New capabilities have been added.

 

  •  Solid Edge P&ID Design – 2D flow diagram and symbol support for P&ID creation supporting strict governing requirements for plant design. 
  •  
  •  Solid Edge Piping Design – Automated 3D piping design with comprehensive 3D part libraries and fully automated isometric drawing output for plant design
  •  
  •  
  • .

 

 

Solid Edge Technical Publications – Introduced in ST10, several enhancements have been added to help users quickly and effectively create technical documentation from their existing Solid Edge models and designs.

 

Solid Edge Simulation - Solid Edge offers enhanced structural and thermal simulation, including transient heat transfer. Time-based history analysis enables simulation of thermal and cooling performance. 

 

Solid Edge Flow Simulation - Free surface flow simulation, lighting and radiation capabilities have been added to allow digital “what if” analysis.

 

Enhancements have also been made to the Solid Edge Generative Design package and the Solid Edge Reverse Engineering package, to make them easier to use and more effective.

 

 

Not to be overshadowed by the portfolio packages, Solid Edge 2019 has delivered some nice enhancements that the customer base has requested. Here are my top 5 favorite enhancements:

 

 

  •  
  • 1.Auto-Simplify command - Auto-Simplify in conjunction with various commands in assembly Simplification including Enclosure, can now be used to quickly simplify multiple assembly occurrences to create an approximate simplified assembly representation.

 

 


 

This is the closest I’ve seen them come to a shrink wrap command, that so many customers have been requesting.

  •  
  • 2.Create Design Bodies command - A new “Intersect” option
    that will ease the reverse engineering process where we need to convert
    mesh bodies to solid bodies. However, the cool thing about this command is that it can be used for finding out volumes of tanks and enclosed volumes with complicated shapes.

 


  •  
  •  
  • 3.Design for Cost – A new pane in Solid Edge allowing users to estimate cost of sheet metal parts. Costs are based on material and manufacturing operations.

 


 

 

  • 4.Break axis for broken view – Finally we can create a broken view on and angled view. This has been a long-requested ER.

 

 

  •  
  • 5.Multi-Slot Feature – Added the ability to place multiple slot occurrences of the same parameters at the same time.

 



Once again, Siemens delivers some great new technology while fulfilling many customer requests. I’ve just touched on the highlights in this blog. If you want more information, Siemens has created the following site to highlight and demonstrate Solid Edge 2019:
Conclusion


https://solidedge.siemens.com/en/solutions/products/complete-product-development-portfolio/whats-new-in-solid-edge-2019/?elqTrackId=b24b03ee3f7d45a39a4288396da078bf&elq=502460ba9e684028bf64f304eb5083c7&elqaid=3492&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=1316

 

 

Note: At the time of this article, no date for availability of Solid Edge 2019 had been released. But if previous releases are any indication, it should be available sometime in July.

Creating holes around a tube in a helical pattern

John Pearson - Thursday, May 10, 2018

Recently I had an interesting demo, where I was asked to model a tube with helically patterned holes. I was sure that we could do it, but I was surprised at the simplicity of it. But as I always say, everything is simple if you know what you are doing. Needless to say, the prospect was amazed at the speed with which we made his part and, I’m pleased to say, has become a customer. So, I thought I’d share this knowledge with our blog readers and I hope you find it beneficial.

 

Here is the image of the finished model.

 


 

To create the model, I first created the tube and placed the first hole.

 


 

Next, I created a tangent plane aligned with the center of the hole.

 


 

I then calculated the wrapped distance. By this I mean the perimeter length that I wanted to wrap the first helical curve.

 


 

In this example, I wanted the holes to wrap a quarter way around the tube. Remember that the arc length dimension (X) can be achieved by using the Smart Dimension command and selecting the length option.

 


 

Next, I created an angled line on the tangent plane, where the distance between the top and bottom of the line, equals the wrapped distance from the previous step.

 


 

I then wrapped the line, to the surface of the tube, using the Wrap Sketch command.

 



 

Note: Another way to create this curve is to use the Helical Curve command.

 

 

Now a curve existed along which I could create a pattern. I first selected the hole and then selected the Pattern Along a Curve command. To get the correct orientation of the holes, I used the Chord Length option.

 


 

Before accepting the pattern, I clicked on the Advanced Options.

 


 

I selected the Follow Using Surface and Curve Position options, and then selected the outer cylindrical face, as the surface to follow.

 


  •  
  • Finally, I used the Circular Pattern command to pattern the results around the tube.
 

  •  
  • As you can see, this resulted in the correct orientation of the holes as they wrapped around the tube.

 

Again, knowledge of the advanced options was the key to achieving this pattern. If you need to learn about advance modeling techniques, you may want to attend one of our 3-day Advance Modeling courses. To learn more about this, and other course offerings, please visit our training page, on our website, at http://www.designfusion.ca//technical-training.html, or contact your Account Manager for details.

 

New Year - New Challenges

John Pearson - Monday, January 15, 2018

 

As we enter into 2018, let me first wish everyone a profitable and happy new year. This is my 31st new year in the CAD/CAM industry, and I have seen incredible advances in the technology. I think it would be safe to say that half of my job is spent keeping up with the technological changes in our industry. Unfortunately, most of our customers are too busy making products, and lack the time to investigate, let alone learn, the latest technology. In fact, many current CAD, and CAM, users are not using the most efficient processes or commands in their systems. Simply because they are not aware of their existence or they lack the time to learn how to use them.

 

Profile of your average user

 

Based on my experience, the average CAD/CAM user has a definite assignment or workload to achieve within a given time period. This time period usually does not allow for any research or self-training. They must complete the task and move on to the next. As a result, users tend to find what works and will continue to use that method. No thought is given to researching better or faster methods. This may work for a period of time, but offers no chance for acceleration of work output.

 

For example; suppose a user has to place ten occurrences of a single component into an assembly, with each component in a different orientation. The user may place and align each component individually, which may take 10 – 20 minutes. If the user is aware of the new Clone Component command, this same task could be done in less than 2 minutes.

 

 

 

Furthermore, the user’s focus is on getting his/her work completed. Which, most managers would agree, is the proper focus. However, certain processes or methods may lead to problems downstream, in other areas of the company. The average user may not realize, nor even care, what happens once the job leaves their desk. But from an upper management level, this could be, and often is, a major concern. If a new or different method could be taught, to the front-end user, it may offer considerable time savings, in other parts of the company.

 

Some users will make the effort to learn and adopt the new technology, on their own. A noble cause, which may not always prove fruitful, and may actually cause greater confusion or frustration for the user. One user may find a more efficient way, but fail to share it with other users. Again, this could cause problems if the other users have to work with a model that has been created in a new way. I’ve had some users tell me that they like a lot of the newer technology, but it will never be adopted where they work.

 

Our role in your company

 

As mentioned above, part of our job is to learn the newest technology. As a Value-Added Reseller, we are constantly providing this knowledge to our customers. Owners, managers, and users often attend our productivity summits, and seminars, to be made aware of the latest enhancements. We also offer numerous courses, to train the users, in the latest and more advanced use of our products. It is estimated that 1 hour of professional training is equivalent to 16 hours of trying to teach yourself. Customers who have attended our courses have always been amazed at the knowledge and practical skills that they can obtain, in a short period of time.

 

Another service, that we provide, is a company wide productivity audit. We go onsite and review your design and manufacturing processes, gathering as much data as possible. We then analyze the data, and formulate a strategy, to streamline your processes, and improve your overall efficiency. This is designed for upper management to ensure that all their departments are working together, for the overall benefit of the company. It places the focus on the company rather than the separate departments, or the individual users. Our customers, that have used this service, have all shown positive results.

 

Benefits of these services

 

In past articles I have discussed the return on investment (ROI) for professional training. I won’t repeat that discussion here, other than to say that the ROI on professional training is faster than most expect. We’ve had some situations where the ROI is a week or two. But what is possibly more important is the overall benefits of professional training. One just has to do a web search, on the “benefits of professional training”, to view a myriad of articles on this topic. Many articles list the following benefits:

 

  • - Keep up with industry changes
  • - Be in touch with all the latest technological advancements
  • - Stay ahead of your competition
  • - Be able to see, and correct, weaknesses and skill gaps
  • - Maintain knowledge and skill
  • - Advance employee skills
  • - Provide an incentive to learn and upgrade skills
  • - Increase job satisfaction levels
  • - Provide internal promotion opportunities for your staff
  • - Attract new talent
  •  

Although most managers agree, they are reluctant to send their staff for training, due to cost in time and money. Designfusion courses are designed to pack as much knowledge as possible into manageable time slots. Our courses range from 2 days to 5 days in duration. The increase in productivity, following these courses, quickly makes up the time and cost invested.

 

The benefits of the productivity audit are similar to training benefits, but with on overall company perspective. These include:

  •  
  • - Ability to determine, and correct, weaknesses and skill gaps
  • - Ensure that your technology is being used correctly and efficiently
  • - Eliminate duplication between departments
  • - Streamline company processes to improve overall efficiency
  • - Improve co-operation and communication between departments

 

Both training and productivity audits involve an investment in time and money. But the results have, and will continue to provide a fast ROI and significant improvement in efficiency throughout your design, engineering, and manufacturing departments.

 

Conclusion

 

“The only way to predict the future is to have power to shape the future” (A quote from Eric Hoffer).

 

When it comes to the CAD/CAM industry, knowledge is power. If you want to have the power to shape your company’s future, you need the knowledge of the latest technology. Only then can you accurately decide how to use the new technology. At Designfusion, this knowledge is one of our products. By attending our productivity summits, or purchasing one of our above-mentioned services, we will provide this knowledge to you. You won’t have to search for the knowledge, read numerous articles, or attempt to interpret technical documentation. We provide it, explain it, and teach it, to you and your users. With a relatively small investment in time and money, you can make 2018 a most productive and efficient year, for you company.

 

If you are interested in these or other services, please visit out Services page at http://www.designfusion.ca//services.html, or contact your Account Manager for more details.

 

Working with Large Assemblies – Part 2

John Pearson - Wednesday, March 29, 2017

 

In this article, I will continue to focus on some of the Solid Edge tools used to deal with large assemblies. As mentioned in the previous article, “Working with Large Assemblies – Part 1”, If you are a Solid Edge user, hopefully you are aware of the following tools for dealing with large assemblies:

 

  • •Simplified Parts
  • •Simplified Assemblies
  •     ○Visible Faces
  •     ○Model Command
  • •Selection Tools
  • •Display Tools
  • •Queries
  • •Zones
  • •Configurations
  • •Limited Update
  • •Limited Save
  • •Assembly Open As options
  • •Assemblies made of synchronous parts.
  •  
  • Combine these tools with some best practices and other tips and tricks, and you’ll find that large assemblies behave more efficiently and are more reliable in Solid Edge, than any other mainstream CAD package.
  •  
  • In this article, I’d like to focus on display tools, configurations, and zones. I’ll look at how they work, how to create them, and some best practices for using them. First, we’ll look at display tools.
  •  
  • Display Tools
  •  
  • One of the easiest ways to improve display performance, when working with large assemblies, is to control which parts in the assembly use physical memory resources. This can be achieved by inactivating components, hiding components and unloading components.
  •  
  • When you first load a part into the assembly environment, using default settings, the part is visible and active. That is to say that both the display data, and underlying math data, is loaded into the assembly file. The more components that are added the more data that is loaded. The more data that gets loaded, the more physical memory is used. The following paragraph is an excerpt from the Solid Edge Help document, and explains how available memory affects performance of the program:
  •  

The amount of physical memory available on your computer affects the performance of all your Windows applications, not just Solid Edge. When the physical memory is completely allocated, some operations are swapped to virtual memory. Virtual memory is disk space on your hard drive allocated for use when physical memory resources are not available.

 

Virtual memory is much slower than physical memory. When any application has to swap information between virtual memory and physical memory to complete a task, system performance slows down considerably. You can improve performance by increasing available physical memory in the following ways:

 

   Reduce the demand for physical memory

   

    Install additional physical memory in your computer

 

Note

See the readme.htm file in the Solid Edge folder for additional information on memory recommendations for Solid Edge.

 

You can reduce the demand for physical memory in 3 different methods:

 

Hide components: This allows you to unload the display data of the components. It also makes your display less cluttered, allowing you to work more efficiently with the displayed parts.

 

Unloading Components: Once the components are hidden, you can unload them using the Unload Hidden Parts command. This unloads the part from memory, freeing up the memory for other tasks.

 

Inactivate components: This allows you to unload the underlying math data on components, but still maintains the display data. You can see the component and the component will maintain any attached assembly relationships.

 

Of course, if you hide a component, you can also show the component at any time. Likewise, you can activate a component when you need to perform any task that requires the underlying math data.

 

 

Configurations

 

When working with a large assembly, it is common to work on specific areas or sections of the assembly, at different times. Configurations allow you to capture and control isolated displays of those specific work areas or sections. For example, if you are working on a large vehicle assembly, you may want to focus on the rear wheel mechanism. You can inactivate, hide, or even unload, the rest of the assembly. Thus, only showing the components of the rear wheel mechanism. Then you can create a configuration, and call it Rear Wheel Mechanism.

 

 


 

Once you’ve defined the configuration, you can use the Assembly Configuration list in the Home tab > Configuration group, to apply the specific display configuration. This allows you to quickly display, hide, inactivate, and unload specific components.

 


 

Furthermore, when you open an assembly, you can select it to open to a specific display configuration.

 


 

You can also place the configuration into a drawing view, by selecting it from the Drawing View Wizard options.

 

 

 


 

Zones

 

Zones are similar to configurations, but provide additional intelligence, to aid the user. A zone is a defined work envelope, which allows you to see either all the components inside the zone, or all the components inside and overlapping the zone. For example, imagine that you are responsible for the modeling of a conveyer belt sub-assembly, on a large machine assembly. Inside the large machine assembly, you can create a conveyer zone, as shown below:

 

 


 

Like a configuration, you can display only the components inside of the zone.

 

 


 

But you can also display any overlapping components.

 


 

This provides the additional advantage of seeing any components that interfere with your zone, that may have been added by another user. Thus, making zones an ideal tool for large assemblies that are created and modified by multiple users. You also have the same added benefits offered with configurations, allowing you to open an assembly into a specific zone, and allowing you to place specific zones into a drawing view.

 

Summary

 

Display tools, configurations, and zones, are just a few of the tools in Solid Edge, used to accelerate work and improve performance in large assemblies. This article has been a brief overview of these tools. There are many additional options and benefits not covered in this article. Further information can be found in the Solid Edge Help documents, or you can attend one of our Advanced Assembly courses, where we teach all of the methods to deal with large assemblies, plus many more tools for creating, editing, and managing assemblies. The complete course syllabus can be found on our training page, at the following link: http://www.designfusion.ca//technical-training.html. Look for the third part of Working with Large Assemblies in the near future.

 

Working with Large Assemblies – Part 1

John Pearson - Thursday, March 23, 2017

One of the most prominent issues, that has bogged down many CAD systems, is the ability to deal with large assemblies. Despite improved hardware and continuing CAD improvements, this issue is still a top complaint among many CAD users. In some cases, it is the CAD system’s architecture that causes the system to slowdown as the assembly size increases. However, with Solid Edge, most cases we encounter are the result of the user being unaware of tools and/or best practices for dealing with large assemblies. If you are a Solid Edge user, hopefully you are aware of the following tools for dealing with large assemblies:

 

 

  • • Simplified Parts
  • • Simplified Assemblies
  •      ○Visible Faces
  •      ○Model Command
  • • Selection Tools
  • • Display Tools
  • • Queries
  • • Zones
  • • Configurations
  • • Limited Update
  • • Limited Save
  • • Assembly Open As options
  • • Assemblies made of synchronous parts.
  •  
  • Combine these tools with some best practices and other tips and tricks, and you’ll find that large assemblies behave more efficiently and are more reliable in Solid Edge, than any other mainstream CAD package.
  •  
  • In this article, I’d like to focus on Simplified Parts and Simplified Assemblies. I’ll look at how to create them and best practices for using them. First, we’ll look at Simplified Parts.
  •  
  • Simplified Parts
  •  
  • Solid Edge defines a simplified part as:
  •  
  • A part that has had some of its features hidden using the commands in the Simplify Model environment. When you simplify a part, it will process faster in an assembly. You can control whether the simplified version or the designed version of the part is displayed in the assembly.
  •  
  • For an example of a simplified part, let’s look at the following part, which is the back of a clock.
 

 
  • Notice that this part contains, screw holes for attachment, and fill pattern of holes for ventilation. To simplify the part, you start by selecting Tools tab > Model group > Simplify option.

 


 

This creates a separate header in the PathFinder, similar to creating a flat pattern in the Sheet Metal environment.

 


 

You can now use the Delete Faces, Delete Regions, Delete Holes, or Delete Rounds commands to simplify your part. These commands are found on the Home tab, in the Modify group.

 


 

In this example, the Delete Holes command was used to create the following simplified part. Notice the Delete Holes feature under the Simplify header, in the PathFinder.

 


 

In the part environment, you can toggle between the two versions of the part, using the Tools tab > Modal group.

 

        

 

         

 

 

When placed in the assembly, you can select which version you want displayed by using the shortcut menu in the PathFinder.

 


 

This allows you to use the lighter weight, simplified version, in the assembly while you work. But you can easily toggle on the designed part for final display or any other time you may need it.

 


 

Simplified Assemblies

 

Similar to a simplified part, you can create a simplified version of a sub-assembly, to be used in the top-level assembly. Solid Edge provides two methods for creating simplified assemblies. Both have advantages and disadvantages, so it is up to the user to decide which will best suit their needs. Prior to selecting the method, you first have to tell the system that you want to create a simplified version of your assembly. To do this, go to the Tools tab > Model group, and select the Simplify option.

 

 

 

Now you must select either the Visible Faces command, or the Model command, which are the two methods used to create the simplified version of the assembly.

 


 

Visible Faces

 

The Visible Faces command has the advantage of rapid creation of the simplified version of your assembly. The disadvantage is that it is not associative to the designed version of the assembly. When you make changes to the designed version, you have to remember to update the simplified version. Solid Edge defines the Visible Face method as:

 

Creates a simplified representation of an assembly by processing the assembly to show only the exterior envelope of faces and by excluding parts, such as small parts. This improves interactive performance when you use the simplified representation of the assembly as a subassembly in another assembly or to create a drawing of a large assembly.

 


 

Essentially, you create an outer shell of the designed assembly with the option to hide any small components, such as hardware parts, exposed to the outer shell. This is ideal for assemblies with many internal components, that are not visible from the outside of the assembly.

 

Simplified Assembly Model (SAM)

 

The second method is the Model command. This command launches the Simplified Assembly Model environment, often referred to as SAM. Solid Edge defines the Model command as:

 

Creates a simplified representation of an assembly creating a solid representation of the simplified assembly. The solid model is stored as ordered solid geometry within the assembly.

 


 

The SAM environment allows users to create rapid enclosure of the model, and then use ordered modelling to modify the enclosures to better represent the assembly shape. These simplified models are associative to the designed assembly. Plus, you can create simplified version of framed or cage like assemblies, that would be poor candidates for the Visible Face method. The disadvantage is that this can take a bit longer to create, than the Visible Face method.

 

Using the simplified version

 

Whichever method you use, the simplified version can be shown, in a higher level assembly, using the shortcut menu in the PathFinder.

 


 

In the Solid Edge Help documents, under Controlling simplified assemblies, you will find the following table, illustrating the many ways to control simplified assemblies.

 


 

It is important to note that simplified assemblies should only be made if it is a sub-assembly, of a higher-level assembly. Creating them will actually add weight to the assembly itself. However, you can significantly reduce the weight, of the higher-level assembly, when used in the higher-level assembly. Solid Edge best describes this as follows:

 

Simplified assemblies and memory usage

 

When you create a simplified representation of an assembly, the data storage requirements for the assembly document increase because the surface data for the simplified representation is stored in the assembly document.

 

The size increase required to support the simplified representation is small when compared to the size requirements of all the documents that make up the assembly.

 

When you place a simplified assembly document as a subassembly into another assembly, the memory requirements required to display the higher-level assembly drop dramatically. This improves performance and also allows you to work with larger data sets more effectively.

 

This performance improvement also applies when creating a drawing of a simplified assembly. Because less memory is required to support the simplified data set, the drawing views will process quicker.

 

Summary

 

As mentioned in the beginning of the article, Simplified Parts and Simplified Assemblies, are just two methods of dealing with large assemblies. The intent here is to make sure you are aware of them and provide an overview of their benefits. The detailed creation and use, of these tools, require much more space than allotted for this blog. Further information can be found in the Solid Edge Help documents, or you can attend one of our Advanced Assembly courses, where we teach all of the methods to deal with large assemblies, plus many more tools for creating, editing, and managing assemblies. The complete course syllabus can be found on our training page, at the following link: http://www.designfusion.ca//technical-training.html. Future blog articles will provide further overviews of the other tools for dealing with large assemblies.

 

How to Export Quality Images in Drafting

Stephen Rose - Tuesday, January 03, 2017

Introduction:

 

  • This FAQ explains the steps to generate quality shaded image views in drafting, including the use of translucency. 

 

Requirements:

 

  • Understanding of Modeling and Drafting environments in NX

 

Step By Step Process…

  •  
  • 1.Generate your solid body, or load an existing solid part, and adjust translucency as required.
  • 2.Switch to the Drafting environment and generate a sheet.
  • 3.On the top ribbon select the <File> Tab, then choose Preferences -> Drafting

 


 

  • 4.Under the <View > expandable menu select <Workflow>, then scroll down until you see the Visual Settings group in the right-hand pane.In that group check <þ> Use translucency and <þ> Use Line Antialiasing then select <OK>.(n.b. See end of document for anti-alias impacts)
  •  
  • 5.Place a view of your choice on the sheet drawing (the default will be a wire-frame view.

 


 

  • 6.Select the drafting view boundary, right-click and choose Settings
  • .
  • 7.For best results, in the left-hand pane, under the <Common> expandable menu select <Configuration> , and in the Settings group in the right-hand pane set preference to Exact Representation, rather than Lightweight.You can specify the curve tolerance here also.

 


 

  • 8.Now scroll down further in the left-hand pane and select <Shading>, and in the Format Group in the right-hand pane change the Rendering style from Wireframe, to Fully Shaded.Make any other adjustments needed for surface Shininess, then in the Tolerance group select one of the default Tolerances, or chose Customize to edit manually.Then click <OK>.

 


 

  • 9.You will then see results similar to this:

 


 

  • 10.You can then set other view dependent preferences if you want hidden lines, or smooth lines, shown different than the default setting.      Default

 

      Smooth Edges lightened

 

      Hidden lines processed

 

  • 11.Once your views are set you can use File->Export->pdf, you can use File->Print to a pdf, (with Export shaded views as wireframe left Unchecked), or you can File->Plot to plot to a suitable configured printer--or even plot out to a graphics format such as TIFF.

 

n.b.Out of the Box the Graphic Plotting format resolution is set quite low.If you need a higher resolution you can go into the plotter administration and change the values.

  •  
  • 12.To set these Graphic Formats resolutions go to File->Utilities->Printer Administration, you are then prompted to Edit the printer setup or Create a new one.(See the Plotter Setup documentation for this initial setup.)Once you are in the Edit menu, you will see the <Graphics Default> tab, under that tab are the types of graphic formats for plotting to. You can edit each of their default resolutions here.

 


 

Anti-Alias Notes in Drafting Mode:

 

Anti-alias choices can make an impact on how well your shaded surface edges show up on the drawings.The two pictures directly below show the Drafting Preference setting “Use Anti-Aliasing”

 

  

Use Anti-Alias Unchecked (OFF)               Use Anti-Alias Unchecked (ON)


 

Adjusting Full-Scene Antialiasing toggle, can also sometimes improve results.

 




ST9 Assembly In context Contour Flange

Manny Marquez - Thursday, October 13, 2016

 

Check out our other videos here

How to: Reverse Engineer a Feature from a Round Surface

Manny Marquez - Tuesday, December 08, 2015

 

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NX Isocline Series.Part I of III, the General Isocline Split

Stephen Rose - Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Overview

 

There are common poor-practices in the moulding industry, in this series we will shed light on some.

 

They often occur due to:

 

Lack of internal company best practices; attempting to rush though a project to meet the common compressed deliveries of today’s industry; lack of available tools in competitor software products; lack of awareness by the designer; or sometimes due to lack of training in the functions/tools available to the designer.

 

In this series we will cover several scenarios where the right feature functions, and the right training, can create a better finished product and more stable steel conditions.Stable steel conditions allow the mould to stand up to high production volume and eliminate production downtime due to pulling the mould for repair.Having more of the finished parts being passed through QC inspection, and having less downtime of the mould, both contribute into a lower life cycle cost of the project.

 

The scenarios we are going to cover in this series include:


  • I)The general Isocline split (This entry)
  • II)The corner contoured split
  • III)Mechanism lead in and angled Isocline.


What is an Isocline?


For those unfamiliar with the term Isocline, here is the dictionary definition: i-soc-line, noun, a line connecting points of equal gradient or inclination.


Where to find it

 

The Isocline Feature can be found several ways.If you are familiar with the traditional NX menu you will easily find it under Menu->Insert->Derived Curve->Extract

 

If you are more comfortable with the NX Ribbon style interface first you will need to have the Advance Role loaded, or your own customized Role where you have already added the Extract Curve to your ribbon. In the Advanced Role you will find it in CURVE->More Gallery->Derived Curve group->Extract Curve

There is always the command finder where you can search the Isocline feature and access it directly.

 

Use: Part I, The General Isocline Split

Here we have a moulded part with a full radius around the periphery of the wall-stock edge.

 


 

This is a close-up view of the radius following the outer wall-stock edge.

 


 

Common Poor-practice for Building Parting-line Split

The common poor-practice seen in the moulding industry is pulling off the parting-line split from the edge of the radius.Typically this is seen on somewhat vertical walls where the low draft angle doesn’t show much deviation from the radius edge to the true tangent apex of the radius (as compared to the die-draw).

 


 

From this close-up section below (and using iso-view above) you can see the designer selected the radius edge as the split for the mould.However based on the vertical die-draw axis (+Z) you can see that the radius actually bulges out past this split point to become slightly under-cut to die-draw.This causes a die-lock condition for the moulded part.

 

Several reasons why this goes unnoticed in the manufacturing process can be attributed to, but not limited to:

 

A)The undercut condition is very small and as the moulded part shrinks it releases itself from the under-cut and is no longer die-locked.

 

B)The mould was cut vertically in the Z axis so the cutter never actually cuts in the under-cut condition—thus leaving the customer with a blunted radius.

 

C)The mould is cut as shown but during hand polishing operations the top lip of the core is polished away leaving open draft—This then creates a mis-match condition where the core steel is stepped out past the cavity edge, and then polishing of the cavity edge is necessary to bring it over to the new core position.

 


 

Best-Practice for Building Parting-Line Split

First enter the Extract menu from either the traditional Menu button or through the Ribbon interface and choose Isocline.

 

Menu button:

 


 

Ribbon Interface:

 


 

Once in the Isocline dialog box:

 

1. We select the die-draw axis either using the default inferred vector selection, or any of the options in the Vector drop down list.If necessary you can then use the reverse vector orientation option. Note:after selecting the axis the dialog still shows 0 for the selection even though you have defined it, at this point hit OK to accept the vector selection.

 


 

2.In this case we make sure the Single option is selected as we only want one set of curves.(The family option lets you generate multiple sets of curves between a range and angle step over.)

 

3.We then set the angle requirement--from the die-draw axis-- to create the isocline at.In this case when creating the outer parting split normal to the +Z axis we set this value at 0°.Then click OK to accept the angle and progress to the face selection dialog.

 


 

4.We then select all the faces we wish to process for Isocline creation.This can be done by single on screen selections, or the other selection options presented in the dialog box.Depending on how you intend to use the Isocline command in your process you may want to select all faces in body if you think the data will change enough that all faces need to be processed, however if you are quite sure it will only be these local faces to be accommodated then it’s best to only select the needed faces to reduce the amount of faces processed during updates.After selecting the faces needed in this set click OK.

 



You will be returned to the first Isocline menu again in order to create further Isocline definitions, but in this case click Cancel.

 

An Isocline representing the parting-split is generated (Red Line below).You can see the difference between A) the original radius edge, and B) the position of the Isocline split.

 


 

We now can develop a parting-split surface from the Isocline curve.

 


 

From this close-up section below (and using iso-view above) you can see that the parting-split surface lies at the 0° draft location of the radius and that the split now represents the outermost extent of the radius surface data.This split location ensures open draft to each half of the Core and Cavity.

 


 

If you would like to learn more about this operation and other advanced operations, you should attend one of our advanced NX CAD courses. To arrange for advanced training please contact your Account Manager, or contact us directly at [email protected].





New Template control in ST7

John Pearson - Monday, October 20, 2014

Many of you have received the new ST7 version of Solid Edge. With over 1300 customer requests addressed, in this new release, I feel it’s worth covering the highlights over the next few blog articles. We also offer a “What’s new in ST7” course, for those of you who prefer a more instructed hands-on approach.

I’d like to start with the new template control. When you launch ST7, you’ll notice the newly designed startup screen.



Notice the list of default templates. These templates are populated based on the standards selected in the initial installation. In previous versions it has been a tedious process to change the standard of the default templates. The template folder and template control mechanism has been restructured to make this much easier. Let’s explore this new mechanism.

From the startup screen, click the Edit List link.



Notice that the new Template List Creation dialog appears.



From the Standard Template column, on the left hand side, select the ANSI Inch standard.


Click OK, and notice that the default templates have been updated to the ANSI Inch standard.



This new approach allows for users to set and change their own template standards, regardless of the initial setup standards.

For you users, that may have existing custom templates, it’s very easy to reuse them with this new mechanism. Simply tell Solid Edge where your custom template folder resides. This is the same process as in previous versions. Bring up the Solid Edge Options > File Locations tab.


Select the User templates header and click the Modify button.



Browse to where your custom template folder resides, in your data base. In this example I’m using a “My custom templates” folder.



Click OK to accept the folder location. Then click OK to close the Solid Edge Option dialog.



Notice that the startup screen now contains my custom templates. If you click on the Edit List link again, you’ll notice that the User Templates have been added to the left column, above the Standard Templates.



Again, this new approach allows for users to set and change between their own template standards, including custom templates, regardless of the initial setup standards.

Another new option is the ability to mix templates into a custom list. Suppose that your job requires you to create a series of mechanical drawings. You could create a custom list of different draft templates to allow you to select different standards directly from the startup screen.

To set this up, click on the Edit List link. At the bottom of the Template List Creation dialog, click the create new list button.



In the List name field, type in Draft Templates.



Click OK, and notice that the Draft Templates header is added under a Custom Templates header.



Using the Browse button, located beside the Add Template field, browse to the ANSI Inch Templates and select the “ansi inch draft.dft” file



Click OK. In the Displayed name field, type in ANSI Inch Draft and click the Add button. Notice that you can also add a description if you wish.



Repeat this step and add as many draft templates that you will need. In this example I added the following Draft templates:

o ANSI Metric Draft

o DIN Metric Draft

o ISO Metric Draft



Click OK. Notice the list has been added to the Startup screen.



Click on the Edit List link again. Notice the other options at the bottom of the dialog.



1. You can rename a list.

2. You can delete a list.

3. You can save a list without having it appear on the startup screen.

Even with the creation of a list, you can always switch back to other standards as your need requires.

This is just one of the many useful and time saving enhancements in Solid Edge ST7. If you’d like to learn more, feel free to contact us [email protected], or attend one of our upcoming “What’s new in ST7” courses.