North America's Leading Siemens PLM Partner

Designfusion Blog

Hidden Gems in ST10

John Pearson - Tuesday, July 11, 2017

 

As I write this article, Solid Edge ST10 has been released, but is not yet available for download. Many of the mainstream CAD publications have already published articles, singing the praises of the new Generative Design and Convergent Modeling. They also highlighted the Simulation enhancements, new Solid Edge Technical Documentation, and the 3D Printing tools. Each major enhancement is article worthy on its own. However, some very powerful enhancements have been omitted or just glossed over by these articles. Often, it’s the less popular enhancements that excite the long-time users. I call these the hidden gems. I’d like to introduce you to 6 of these hidden gems in Solid Edge ST10.

 

 

Hidden Gem 1: The new Scale Body command.

 

In the past, to scale a body you had to use the Offset Command, in the Modify group, or synchronous moves. This often would confuse newer users, and many have asked for a simpler scale body command. Solid Edge ST10 has delivered on this request. The new command allows for uniform, and non-uniform scaling. You can select any scale point that you desire, and you can scale multiple bodies at the same time.

 

 

 


 

Note: Non-uniform scaling has options to scale along x, y, and z.

 

 

Hidden Gem 2: Expose corner gap in Sheet Metal commands

 

Another popular request was for Solid Edge to allow users corner gap control in the Bend Corner commands and the Contour Flange command. In ST10 the gap corner values can now be controlled in the 2 and 3 Bend Corner commands, and the Contour Flange command. The value can be changed by using the scroll wheel.

 


 

 

The Variable Table supports the bend corner gap value for ordered sheet metal parts only.

 

 

Hidden Gem 3: The new Clone Component command

 

A couple of releases ago, Solid Edge introduced the Duplicate Component command. In ST10 they are introducing a new Clone Component command. The Clone Component command allows the user to place multiple occurrences of one or more components at different locations in an assembly. Which sounds like what the Duplicate Command does in Solid Edge. The differences are as follows:

  •  
  • - Clone Component placement is based on geometry recognition. Duplicate uses a target part or coordinate system to orient a component.
  •  
  • - The Duplicate command groups the duplicated components as patterns. The Clone Component command will place the components in an assembly group if the “Group cloned components” option is checked on. However, the components are placed individually and not as a pattern.
  •  

  •  
  • - Cloned components have an option to be placed with assembly relationships. Duplicate Component command does not create relationships.

 

These differences allow the user greater flexibility and independent control when placing multiple components into an assembly.

 

 

Hidden Gem 4: The new One Body Assembly command

 

This is a new command that I know will be well received by several of my customers. The new One Body Assembly command allows users to create a representation of an assembly as a single body.

 

 


 

Some of the benefits of a One Body Assembly are:

  •  
  • - Users can remove hidden or redundant detail.
  •  
  • - It allows data sharing while protecting intellectual property.
  •  
  • - Users can use single bodies for complex supplier parts, reference parts, or layouts.
  •  
  • - Use of single bodies will improve performance in large assemblies.

 

 

Hidden Gem 5: Making the background sheet locatable

 

The background sheet geometry can now be located from the working sheet, for precise positioning of objects during placement and modifications. This new option is turned on in the IntelliSketch group.

 

This allows users to locate and snap to the background sheet geometry, while adhering to IntelliSketch preferences like alignment indicator, key points etc.

 

 


 

Hidden Gem 6: Undo enhancements in Draft.

 

If you’ve ever placed the wrong drawing view(s), you will like this next enhancement. ST10 now allows users to hit Undo for drawing view creation. In the past users would have to delete the views. Now all drawing views, as well as Nailboard creation methods, support the undo functionality. Plus, all types of drawing views like orthographic, pictorial and derived views like detail, section etc. are supported with undo functionality.

 

Furthermore, ST10 now allows Undo for drawing view updates. When the update action is undone, drawing views are put back into their previous state. Updates of dependent objects like tables, dimensions and annotations are also considered for the same undo transaction. Plus, changes made on drawing view properties are also logged for undo as ‘Drawing View Properties’.

 

 

Solid Edge ST10 – A Serious Update

 

As stated in Kyle Maxey’s post on Engineering.com, “ST10 looks to be another quality upgrade”

http://www.engineering.com/DesignSoftware/DesignSoftwareArticles/ArticleID/14891/Solid-Edge-Demands-Attention-With-Serious-Update.aspx

 

ST10 delivers new and innovative tools for the future, yet still continues to enhance existing tools. Designfusion will be showcasing many of these new and improved tools in upcoming events. Our first “What’s New in ST10” event will be in Chicago on August 17, 2017. (Click to register here - Password: ST10). More events will be announced in the near future. We look forward to seeing you at one of these events.

 

More control over the tool axis in NX11.0.1

John Pearson - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

 

Two weeks ago, I had the privilege of attending a Cam Forum for Siemens PLM Software partners. A colleague and I drove down to Troy, Michigan, where we were introduced to new NX CAM functionality in NX11.0.1. We also saw some of the future enhancements coming in NX11.0.2 and beyond. Although there were many enhancements that I could discuss, there was one in particular that I found extremely useful. So rather than give a brief overview of all the enhancements, I will focus on one of my favorite enhancements. Once you’ve loaded NX11.0.1, open the help docs and view the what’s new section, if you’d like an overview of all the enhancements.

 

 

Interpolate Tool Axis Enhancements

 

Prior to NX11.0.1, if machining the part below, with the tool shown, you’d have a tool holder collision issue along the wall.

 


 

When situations like this occur, NX now provides a new Control Direction option, when using the Interpolate Vector tool axis option. To access this new option, expand the Tool Axis section, in the operation template. With the Axis option set to Interpolate Vector, click the Edit icon.

 


 

Notice the new Control Direction option under the Interpolation Method.

 


 

The U and V option retains the behavior from previous releases. The U option controls the tool axis in the U direction only. The V option controls the tool axis in the V direction only. These two options give the new behavior.

 

In this example, I’ll select the U from the Control Direction list.

 


 

Notice the two iso curves. Each iso curve contains a system defined vector at each end. Only one vector is now necessary to define the tool axis along each iso curve.

 


 

There is another new option, that allows us to select a system defined vector and tell the system not to consider it, when interpolating the tool axis. You do this by selecting the vector, and selecting the new Ignore Point check box. In this example, I first select vector 4, from the list.

 


 

Note: You may also select the vector by single-clicking in the graphics display. Double-clicking reverses the vector direction.

 

I then select the Ignore Point check box.

 


 

I repeat this step for vector 2.

 


 

Next, I select vector 3 and use the dynamic axis handle to rotate the tool about the YC axis, until the holder no longer collides with the part.

 


 

The third enhancement becomes apparent will doing this rotation. In previous releases, the tool was rotated about the tool tip resulting in the tool cutting below the part surface. The tool now rotates about the contact point and no longer violates the part. See the image below.

 


 

When I verify the tool path, I notice that the tool holder no longer collides with the part wall, but the tool axis begins tilting sooner than necessary. This is because NX tilts the tool axis continuously as it interpolates the tool axis between the two U curves.

 


 

I can add another iso curve to control how long the tool remains vertical before tilting. To do this I return to the Tool Axis section and click Edit again. In the Interpolate Vector dialog, I select the Add New Set icon.

 


 

Next, I select a point on the edge of the part, in the approximate position shown below.

 


 

This defines an additional iso curve with a vector that can be used to control the tilt of the tool. By leaving the ZC vector vertical, the tool axis will remain vertical as it approaches the wall until it reaches this curve.

 


 

This time, when I verify the tool path, the tool axis remains vertical until it reaches the added iso curve. It then begins to tilt as it approaches the next iso curve.

 


 

As you can see from this example, you can now specify either a U or V control direction and ignore system defined vectors, allowing you to interpolate the tool axis for variable axis operations along U or V iso curves, with as little as a single interpolation vector for each curve. This capability greatly simplifies the task of specifying a constant tool axis orientation along the entire U or V curve.

 

Solid Edge: A baker’s dozen of Tips and Tricks (Part 1 of 3)

John Pearson - Thursday, July 02, 2015

 

Recently Designfusion held their annual Productivity Summit at the Microsoft office, in Mississauga. As part of the summit I presented a “Tips and Tricks” session that was well received. I promised that I would share these in a future blog article. So here is a baker’s dozen of tips and tricks:


    • 1.Holding down the Shift Key when using the Rectangle by Center command will create a square. (Added in ST7)

 

 

 

  • 2.Auto dimensioning done the correct way.
  •  

The biggest complaint with auto dimensioning is “I have to delete more dimensions than I would normally place”. However, if you use these settings Solid Edge will only place keyed in dimensions.


 


  •  
  • 3.Controlling rotation point
  •  
  • In the Select mode, Middle Mouse Button (MMB) click, in an empty screen space, to clear the small white select symbol attached to the cursor. The cursor will now appear with no symbols attached.

 

 

 

  • Move the cursor to one of the following positions and hold down the MMB to rotate:
  •  
  • I.Hold the MMB down on a vertex to rotate about the vertex.

 

 

 

  • II.Hold the MMB down on a linear edge to rotate about the linear edge.

 

 

 

  • III.Hold the MMB down on a face to rotate about the point on a face.

 

 

 

  • IV.Hold the MMB down on a circular arc or conic-shaped edge to rotate about the axis of the circular arc or conic-shaped edge.

 

 

 

  • 4.Clipping planes
  •  

I.Choose View tab→Clip group→Set Planes.

 

 

 

II.Select a planar face or reference plane, position the cursor to define the first clipping plane (A), and then click.


III.Position the cursor to define the second clipping plane (B), and then click.

 

 

 

IV.Click Finish.

 

 

 

Note: When you set the Dynamic Clipping option on the command bar, the clipping depth updates dynamically as you move the cursor during the Set Plane 2 Step. When you clear the Dynamic Clipping option the clipping depth updates when you click to define the second clipping plane.


Note: You can turn the clipped display on and off using the ‘Clipping On’ command, located below the Set Planes command, or use the Hot Keys (Ctrl + D).

 

 


New Template control in ST7

John Pearson - Monday, October 20, 2014

Many of you have received the new ST7 version of Solid Edge. With over 1300 customer requests addressed, in this new release, I feel it’s worth covering the highlights over the next few blog articles. We also offer a “What’s new in ST7” course, for those of you who prefer a more instructed hands-on approach.

I’d like to start with the new template control. When you launch ST7, you’ll notice the newly designed startup screen.



Notice the list of default templates. These templates are populated based on the standards selected in the initial installation. In previous versions it has been a tedious process to change the standard of the default templates. The template folder and template control mechanism has been restructured to make this much easier. Let’s explore this new mechanism.

From the startup screen, click the Edit List link.



Notice that the new Template List Creation dialog appears.



From the Standard Template column, on the left hand side, select the ANSI Inch standard.


Click OK, and notice that the default templates have been updated to the ANSI Inch standard.



This new approach allows for users to set and change their own template standards, regardless of the initial setup standards.

For you users, that may have existing custom templates, it’s very easy to reuse them with this new mechanism. Simply tell Solid Edge where your custom template folder resides. This is the same process as in previous versions. Bring up the Solid Edge Options > File Locations tab.


Select the User templates header and click the Modify button.



Browse to where your custom template folder resides, in your data base. In this example I’m using a “My custom templates” folder.



Click OK to accept the folder location. Then click OK to close the Solid Edge Option dialog.



Notice that the startup screen now contains my custom templates. If you click on the Edit List link again, you’ll notice that the User Templates have been added to the left column, above the Standard Templates.



Again, this new approach allows for users to set and change between their own template standards, including custom templates, regardless of the initial setup standards.

Another new option is the ability to mix templates into a custom list. Suppose that your job requires you to create a series of mechanical drawings. You could create a custom list of different draft templates to allow you to select different standards directly from the startup screen.

To set this up, click on the Edit List link. At the bottom of the Template List Creation dialog, click the create new list button.



In the List name field, type in Draft Templates.



Click OK, and notice that the Draft Templates header is added under a Custom Templates header.



Using the Browse button, located beside the Add Template field, browse to the ANSI Inch Templates and select the “ansi inch draft.dft” file



Click OK. In the Displayed name field, type in ANSI Inch Draft and click the Add button. Notice that you can also add a description if you wish.



Repeat this step and add as many draft templates that you will need. In this example I added the following Draft templates:

o ANSI Metric Draft

o DIN Metric Draft

o ISO Metric Draft



Click OK. Notice the list has been added to the Startup screen.



Click on the Edit List link again. Notice the other options at the bottom of the dialog.



1. You can rename a list.

2. You can delete a list.

3. You can save a list without having it appear on the startup screen.

Even with the creation of a list, you can always switch back to other standards as your need requires.

This is just one of the many useful and time saving enhancements in Solid Edge ST7. If you’d like to learn more, feel free to contact us sales@designfusion.com, or attend one of our upcoming “What’s new in ST7” courses.

Solid Edge ST7 Addresses the User's Needs

John Pearson - Sunday, June 01, 2014
Over the years I have seen 14 launches of new versions of Solid Edge. Although each release has always added new and powerful features, there are certain releases that really stand out for me. Solid Edge ST7 is one of those releases. This release has added some long overdue functionality that users have been requesting for years. Many users at the recent SEU2014 commented on how great it will be to utilize these new tools, and how beneficial they will be to their overall design process. In this article I’d like to highlight my top 5 most requested enhancements which have been added to Solid Edge ST7.

1) For years I, and many other users, have been requesting a 3D sketching tool. Yes you can create 3D sketches in older versions, but to be efficient you needed to understand how to use the surfacing and curve tools. Solid Edge ST7 finally introduces 3D Sketching. This functionality combines the 3D path creation tool from XpresRoute along with standard sketching commands, to create a very efficient tool to create your 3D sketches. In Synchronous Part and Sheet Metal environments you will see a new 3D Sketching tab.


In the Ordered Part, Sheet Metal, and Assembly environments, a new 3D Sketch command has been added. This command will launch you into a new 3D Sketch mode.



The new 3D sketching will greatly simplify the ability to define paths for sweep operations (as shown below), plus piping and tubing routes, and wire paths.


2) Along with the 3D Sketching, Solid Edge ST7 has added a ‘Fixed Length Curve’ functionality. This allows a curve to stay at a specified length when the location of either end, or the curve path, is changed. This is ideal for flexible hoses or cables of a fixed length.


3) Another long requested enhancement has been the ability to flatten deformation features. Solid Edge ST7 now allows users to create a blank from any 3D model.


The blank is created with the newly added Blank Body command and is available when you are in the Flatten command.


With accuracy control, and several other options, the new Blank Body command provides flatten capabilities that were only previously available through third party packages costing thousands of dollars. This however is not an add-on. It is included with all Classic and Premium licenses.

4) In Solid Edge ST7 they have revamped the measuring tools. Users have complained about the measuring tools for as long as I can remember. This new look provides more intuitive commands and more control over what you are measuring. You can also save some of the results as variables, or cut and paste results from the information dialog box into other command fields. Although this may seem a trivial enhancement, it should prove to be a welcome one for those users who have to do a lot of measuring during the design process.

5) Another vastly improved area in Solid Edge ST7 is a new and improved Hole Wizard. The new Hole command now allows extensive, standards-based hole placements. It supports most international standards including DIN, ISO and ANSI, and is comprehensive and consistent across the Part, Sheet Metal, and Assembly environments.


So these are my top enhancements in Solid Edge ST7. I choose these based on my personal requirements and requests from our customers over my last 11 years of working with Solid Edge. As you can imagine there are many other powerful and efficient tools added to Solid Edge ST7. In fact there are over 1300 customer requests addressed in the new release. If you would like more information on ST7 you can download the What’s new in Solid Edge ST7 fact sheet, or contact us at sales@designfusion.com. Although no final date has been confirmed, customers can expect Solid Edge ST7 delivery this summer.

Join us at Solid Edge University 2014

John Pearson - Friday, January 31, 2014

 

Siemens PLM Software has announced that this year’s Solid Edge University will be held in Atlanta, Georgia on May 12-14, 2014.  For those of you who have not attended this conference, you are truly missing a great opportunity. Not only do you get a preview of the next release of Solid Edge, but you get to connect with the Solid Edge developers and provide input to the direction of future development. You can also participate in hands-on learning, attend presentations given by CAD users and meet with experts from all aspects of the design continuum. Focus areas will include CAD, design data management, simulation, manufacturing and a host of complementary applications to help you design better. Some of us at Designfusion will be presenting again at this year’s conference.

 

 

This is also a great opportunity to visit with our sponsors and technology partners and learn new ways to enhance the power of Solid Edge. Many partners are set up at the conference, ready to answer any questions you may have. Plus there is no better place to network with other Solid Edge users who make up this vibrant user community.  I personally spoke with the Designfusion customers who attended last year event and everyone said that the learning experience was well worth the cost of the conference.

 

I hope you can join me and my colleagues at the Solid Edge University 2014. For more information, and to take advantage of the early bird registration, go to the Solid Edge University website at http://www.solidedgeu.com/.

Working With Revision Manager

Manny Marquez - Thursday, January 09, 2014

In the past few days, customers have called about revision manager and have asked several questions on how  they can move or copy assemblies to new locations.

There were a few main issues custumers have had in regards to Revision Manager, and what I have done is created multiple scenarios to tackle these issues .  

 

Scenario 1: Copy all assemly with all parts to new location.  

Scenario 2: Copy all parts associated to assembly and folder structure to new location folder.

Scenario 3: If a folder with parts related to an assembly gets nenamed  and links get broken, how to redifine links.  

 

Sample Folder structure (this can be any combination of folder locations) the point is that, we need to move or copy files to a new location.    

 

 

          Scenerio 1: copy all assembly with all parts to new location, this is ideal when you need to clone

          the whole asssembly to send to a customer.  

 

  1. 1. Open TOP level assembly with Revision Manager.

 

 
  1. 2. Expand then select all, this option makes sure that all files will be copied. Notice action is unchanaged.

 

3. Copy; this indicates the coping process.




4.The next step is to set the path for the new location to copy the whole assembly.

 

 

 

5. Final step is to perform actions. At this point the assembly is copied to the (new) folder location.
    However notice the subfolders are NOT copied.  This completes this scenerio.

 

 

   

          Scenerio 2:  Move the whole assembly with subfolder structure and related files only.

          Another method is just to copy all folders to the new location, but note that there may be

          files that do not relate to the assembly.

          In cases where you only need to move  files that relate to that top level assembly and keep the 

          same folder structure, files not related will not copy or move.  

 

6. Open selected assembly with revision manager.

 

 

 

7. We are going to move to (new location) and copy the same folder structure. By selecting the (rename)

    you are moving the files from the (original) folder.

 

 

 

8. Notice action is to rename document.

 

 

 

9. Now click on replace old folder (Original) with new folder (New). Then select replace all then cancel.

 

 

 

 

10.Once replaced, see new folder with new location.

 

 

 

11.Click on Yes and close Revision Manger.

 

12.Notice the new folder structure in new location, notice the subfolders are copied as well.

 

 

 

13.Review new folders using window explorer to take a look at the previous folder location; notice only

     files that were not associated to the assembly did not copy (This is also a good way to isolate

     assemblies) with the folder structure. This complete this scenerio.

 

 

          Scenario 3: Cases when a folder gets renamed and then you open the assembly and notice that

          all links are broken. This is very common in networks with many users.

 

14.So let’s go ahead and rename each folder as shown below, just by adding “1” at the end of each

     word.

 

 

 

     If you try to open the assembly now with RM or Solid Edge, the files will not open; you will get a notice

     that files are missing.

 

 

 

15.Click on the redefine links then select top level folder then ADD (make sure that the subfolder is

     unchecked).

 

 

 

16.The easiest way to get the folder address correctly is by going to the window explorer, and then copy      and paste.

     -(ManufacturedParts) is the original folder

     -(ManufacturedParts1) is renamed folder

     -click next twice

 

 

 

17. Click on Back twice  

 

 

 

18. Repeat for other folders

 

19.Next twice

 


    Close Revision Manager, and then reopen with top level assembly. This completes this scenario.

 

    This was also presented at one of our Solid Edge Productivity summits by Barry

    Shillingford.



ST6 Released!

Cory Goulden - Saturday, July 27, 2013

Hot off the Press….ST6 RELEASED!!!

It is with great anticipation and excitement that I can say Solid Edge ST6 has once again been produced as a top quality product that has TONS of new functionality and features.  The latest version of Solid Edge has been released…officially. 

You may have received a new license file via email earlier.  As this is (once again) an exciting release I wanted to mention a few very high level notes about installing.*

*Of course you will always read and follow the install notes.

Prior versions of Solid Edge required you to turn off User Account Control (UAC) before installing.  This is part of Microsoft’s attempt to make the software more secure.  There are certain areas in programs that require read access and other components that require read and write access.  Microsoft requires programs to have the areas that require write access to be set aside in a designated folder.  This folder, in ST6, is called the “Preferences” folder.

The preferences folder is here:

C:\Program Files\Solid Edge ST6\Preferences

 Things like your license file (SELicense.dat by default), options.xml file, material.mtl file are located here now.  Things a user may need to have modified.  For those of you who attended my presentation on the SEAdmin functionality of SE the preferences folder location itself cannot be changed.   See below for an image of what the contents of this file are.

Happy Edging! 

Solid Edge ST6 introduced at SEU2013 – Part 2

John Pearson - Thursday, July 25, 2013

In last week’s blog I had started to discuss what was new in Solid Edge ST6, as introduced to us at Solid Edge University 2013 (SEU2013). I had left off with mentioning the new enhancements in surface modeling. So let’s continue with what’s new in Part and Sheet Metal modeling.


ST6 Part and Sheet Metal Design


Improved Steering Wheel – now has 3 directional axes to eliminate the annoying need to always flip the steering wheel.




Improved solution manager – including color control, something I had requested for some of our color blind users.


Faster revisions with synchronous technology - Include or exclude edges of peer parts during creation. Added exclude interior loops or use only interior loops, to the Extrude planar face option from ST5.


Better reuse with synchronous technology


  • ·         More robust rectangular and circular patterning.
  • ·         Pattern recognition allows count and instance editing of imported patterns.
  • ·         Partial round delete with end capping.
  • ·         Dimensioning chamfered edges uses virtual vertices.

 

Create stamped sheet metal parts with a single command – emboss a tool or punch into a sheet metal part.


Stiffen parts by adding features across bends - add beads, dimples, louvers, emboss features across bends


Sheet Metal Features on Parts - sheet metal features can be placed on regular ordered parts of uniform thickness without having to transform the part to sheet metal. This provides an especially efficient method in stamped metal design.

Again, there are many other enhancements in Part modeling which will benefit all users.

 

ST6 Assembly Design


Solid Edge continues their dominance in working with large assemblies. Along with some nice enhancements to PathFinder Indicators and Physical Properties, here are my favorite improvements:


Assembly occurrences can now be used for inputs to Boolean operations - No inter-part copy of the geometry is needed and multiple tool body components can be selected (see previous blog article).


Faster display - New display capabilities speed pan/zoom/fit by up to 2 times.


Complete overhaul of simplify assemblies


         New environment for creating user defined simplified representations.

         Enclose component automatically encloses components with rectangular or cylindrical solids.

         Duplicate body speeds simplification of copied or patterned components.

         Goal is to simplify models for effective design of 1 Million+ parts.

 

Create In-Place Enhancements – moved to optional QuickBar with better control over placing the origin.

 

Synchronous Assembly Modeling Peer Edge Locate – allows for improved key-point selection when modeling in the Assembly.


Plus several new enhancements to synchronous commands have been made while a user is in-place activated into a part or sheet metal file from an assembly.




ST6 Drafting


Two of the most exciting enhancements in Solid Edge ST6 appear in the Draft environment. When the following was demonstrated they received an enthusiastic round of applause from the audience at SEU2013.


Alignment control


         Align annotations with a linear, rectangular or fitted shape.

         Reposition the annotations by dragging the alignment shape.

 

Dimension auto-arrange


         Clean up messy dimensions with a single mouse click.

         Select dimensions by fence or by drawing view.

         Creates and aligns dimension grouping.

 

Some other notable changes in drawing production are:

 

         Faster zoom/pan, and hatch display with large 2D drawings.

         Auto-constrain 2D elements during drag-modify.

         Retrieve slot feature centerlines.

         Partial bolt hole circles.

         Simplified drawing view wizard.

         Shortcuts and easier sheet tab creation.

         Edit tables in place.

         Better editing of embedded documents.

         Drawing views are now displayed before placement.

         Derived break lines from one view to another.

         Align any drawing view with key-points or drawing view centers.

         2D directional fence select: left for overlapping, right for inside locate to.

         Create tables from placed blocks on schematic drawings.

 

These enhancements, and more, continue to make Solid Edge’s drawing capabilities the best on the market.




Help for SolidWorks refugees


One other noteworthy feature, added to Solid Edge ST6, is the new SolidWorks migration tool. Siemens is going after the SolidWorks customers who are concerned about the kernel change and loss of legacy data. This tool, combined with some other enhancements, will allow the SolidWorks user to:


  • ·        Protect their investment in design.
  • ·        Get the power of synchronous technology.
  • ·        Maintain speed and reliability with Parasolid.

  • If you are a SolidWorks customer and are concerned about the ongoing changes and mixed messages from Dassault Systemes, Siemens is willing to help you transition to Solid Edge, while protecting and reusing your legacy data.


 

Solid Edge ST6


As mentioned at the beginning of the article, I have only scratched the surface of what’s new in Solid Edge ST6. I did not even mention the enhancements in the simulation package, standard parts, framing, or data management. I will attempt to expand on the improvements in future blog articles. But I felt it important to give an overall account of Solid Edge ST6, as presented at SEU2013. I have worked with Solid Edge for over 10 years now and I am truly impressed with how the development team continues to listen to the actual customers. Solid Edge ST6 enhancements have truly been driven by the customers. The 3 core values for this release were to:


  1. 1.    Accelerate design for faster time to market.
  2. 2.    Faster revisions for higher repeat business.
  3. 3.    Better reuse for lower development costs.


Siemens has done a great job at meeting these core values with Solid Edge ST6. Judging by the excitement at SEU2013, this looks to be a great release with customers eagerly awaiting the arrival of Solid Edge ST6. The release date has not been finalized yet, but the general consensus is that customers can expect to receive their copy sometime in August 2013.

Solid Edge ST6 introduced at SEU2013 – Part 1

John Pearson - Friday, July 12, 2013

In the last few blog articles I have highlighted a couple of enhancements coming in Solid Edge ST6. Having just returned from Solid Edge University 2013 (SEU2013), where customers were introduced to Solid Edge ST6, I thought I should try and list some of the more than 1300 enhancements. Clearly, with over 1300 enhancements, it would be a major job to list and discuss all the changes, so I will only highlight some of the major improvements.


Before looking at some of the new features in Solid Edge ST6, I think it’s worth mentioning that in Q2, Solid Edge license business in the US has seen a 25% year over year growth. Combine this with the growing number of packages that work with Solid Edge; it is clear the Siemens is fully committed to the continued growth and success of Solid Edge.


Some of the new partners introduced at SEU 2013 include CAMWorks for Solid Edge, KeyShot and CRABCAD, just to name a few. I found the CAMWorks for Solid Edge to be the most intriguing new partner. It allows for machining of your Solid Edge model directly in the Solid Edge package. I will discuss this in future blog articles once I have been fully trained on this new package.



It was also clear, to the over 500 users that attended SEU2013, that Siemens is listening to their customers. As I mentioned earlier, Solid Edge ST6 satisfies over 1300 customer requests. This is the breakdown as presented to us at SEU2013:




So what did I find to be the most intriguing new features? First, I really like the new ability to install multiple versions on the same computer (see earlier blog article on how to set this up). Although this is for test purposes only, it will go a long way to allowing smoother upgrades, especially for smaller companies. Solid Edge ST6 also adds some new user experience tools, such as:


New user persona environments - to customize the user environment based on his level of expertise with the software.


YouTube in Solid Edge - The YouTube search and upload feature within Solid Edge ST6 allows you to upload pre-recorded videos, or record your own video within the UI and upload it directly through the Solid Edge application.


Record Videos in Solid Edge - Solid Edge ST6 provides the ability to record design workflows within the application.


Command Finder Updates - Enhancements have been made to the Command Finder to provide the user with additional information for searched items that are not considered Solid Edge commands.

 

Android Tablet Viewer - Solid Edge now has an App available to view part, sheet metal, and assembly files on an android powered tablet. Similar to the iPad App introduced in ST5.

Combine these new tools with enhanced learning tools and the expanded Solid Edge community, and you will find the overall user experience is greatly improved.


ST6 Surface Modeling


Some major improvements in Part modeling also impressed me and many of the other users at SEU2013. My favorite enhancements include the following:


Major overhaul of the Surfacing environment

  • ·         New easy-to-use 3D surface control handles for on screen edits of curvature with graphical            magnitude handles and numeric values.
  • ·         Key-point curves now with C2 support.
  • ·         Robust bounded surfaces also with C2 support.
  • ·         Blue surface command now has C2 handles and optional curvature combs.
  • ·         Trim and extend is now a single super command.
  • ·         Ruled Surface command added - allows the user to pick a curve and
  •        generate a sweep of linear cross section along a curve or edge.
  • ·         Redefine Surface command added - that allows a surface or group of adjacent surfaces to            be replaced with a single editable BlueSurf.
  • ·         Model Reflective Display - a new display mode has been introduced specifically designed            for studying curvature and volumes of surface models of symmetric parts.
  • ·         Plus so much more to allow users to model highly aesthetic consumer products.

There are many more improvements to mention, and I will continue to do so in next week’s blog.