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Solid Edge: A baker’s dozen of Tips and Tricks (Part 1 of 3)

John Pearson - Thursday, July 02, 2015

 

Recently Designfusion held their annual Productivity Summit at the Microsoft office, in Mississauga. As part of the summit I presented a “Tips and Tricks” session that was well received. I promised that I would share these in a future blog article. So here is a baker’s dozen of tips and tricks:


    • 1.Holding down the Shift Key when using the Rectangle by Center command will create a square. (Added in ST7)

 

 

 

  • 2.Auto dimensioning done the correct way.
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The biggest complaint with auto dimensioning is “I have to delete more dimensions than I would normally place”. However, if you use these settings Solid Edge will only place keyed in dimensions.


 


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  • 3.Controlling rotation point
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  • In the Select mode, Middle Mouse Button (MMB) click, in an empty screen space, to clear the small white select symbol attached to the cursor. The cursor will now appear with no symbols attached.

 

 

 

  • Move the cursor to one of the following positions and hold down the MMB to rotate:
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  • I.Hold the MMB down on a vertex to rotate about the vertex.

 

 

 

  • II.Hold the MMB down on a linear edge to rotate about the linear edge.

 

 

 

  • III.Hold the MMB down on a face to rotate about the point on a face.

 

 

 

  • IV.Hold the MMB down on a circular arc or conic-shaped edge to rotate about the axis of the circular arc or conic-shaped edge.

 

 

 

  • 4.Clipping planes
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I.Choose View tab→Clip group→Set Planes.

 

 

 

II.Select a planar face or reference plane, position the cursor to define the first clipping plane (A), and then click.


III.Position the cursor to define the second clipping plane (B), and then click.

 

 

 

IV.Click Finish.

 

 

 

Note: When you set the Dynamic Clipping option on the command bar, the clipping depth updates dynamically as you move the cursor during the Set Plane 2 Step. When you clear the Dynamic Clipping option the clipping depth updates when you click to define the second clipping plane.


Note: You can turn the clipped display on and off using the ‘Clipping On’ command, located below the Set Planes command, or use the Hot Keys (Ctrl + D).

 

 


Transfer of loads from Motion analysis to FEA study within Solid Edge

Frederic Menage - Thursday, June 11, 2015

 

 

Check out our other videos : youtube.com/designfusion

How to: Dimensions in Draft Part 3

Manny Marquez - Thursday, June 04, 2015

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3pXCcPMin4

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVAmo2xrVd0


More videos here: https://www.youtube.com/EdgeCanada

​How to build a study with many connected parts

Frederic Menage - Saturday, April 25, 2015

 (Assembly environment – Simulation module)


Introduction


When there are many parts in a study, the amount of connectors (created automatically or manually) can be overwhelming. I t is important to remain in control of those connectors as their quantity increases. Otherwise, it will be a difficult task to find the source of the problem when a fatal error occurs during solving.

 

A recommended method for medium size assemblies

The user of Solid Edge can include only a subset of the parts that will eventually need to be analyzed. This way, a limited amount of connectors will have to be created. The workflow is to modify the boundary conditions to accommodate this partial study (add temporary load or constraint) and solve to verify that the connectors play their role and keep the studied parts connected. Then, the user can modify the definition of the study to add more parts or start from a copy of the study to keep a backup of each step. Each following steps, necessary to build the full study, will require the addition of new connectors and modification of the boundary conditions.

 

A recommended method for large size assemblies (with thin walled parts)

The user of Solid Edge should use mid-surfaces (psm) or other type of surfaces when analysing thin-walled parts. In addition to this, the user has the option to connect surfaces and create one or several associated bodies for the analysis. This will remove the need for connectors as the nodes merge at the intersections. This approach needs to be considered seriously when hundreds of parts are being analyzed.

Conclusion


With these workflows, the Solid Edge user who wants to build a complex analysis can confidently and progressively add all the required simulation features to run a full study. The capacity to verify a subset of connectors and, afterwards, move on confidently to the next group of connectors can be a huge time saver when dealing with large assemblies.

How to: Manage Dimensions in Draft Part 2

Manny Marquez - Thursday, April 16, 2015

 

Part 1: https://youtu.be/d3pXCcPMin4

How to: Manage Dimensions in Draft

Manny Marquez - Friday, April 10, 2015

 

Part 1 of 2 - check out part 2 here: https://youtu.be/nVAmo2xrVd0

​How to repair the parametric links in an assembly (Assembly environment and V&M)

Frederic Menage - Thursday, January 29, 2015

 

Introduction


A parametric assembly contains links that can transfer data (number, geometric references) between components so that they can share common characteristics. Such a link can be updated if the communicating components are activated and if the active context wasn’t modified since the link was created.

 

The context


One way to alter the context is to use the ‘save as’ command when in the assembly environment. Solid Edge warns the user about the danger of such an operation:

 


 

Analyzing a “broken” model


If you have a parametric assembly that is unresponsive, select a part with a chain beside it and edit it. At the top of the modelling tree for that part, you will see a ‘Links’ collector. If you expand it, you will see the context (the complete path is in the tool tip as shown below) in which parametric features of that part can receive data from other components.

 


 

How to fix it with ‘Redefine links’


Open the View & Markup application (Start/Programs/Solid Edge...). In the ‘Tools’ tab of the ribbon, start the command called ‘redefine links’.

Select folder(s) in which all components of the “broken” assembly as well as the assembly itself reside. Note: for a complex assembly with many components distributed across multiple folders, it is possible to use a result log (txt file) of the V&M ‘search broken links’ command.

Enter the path including the filename to the original (old) context (the one listed in Solid Edge as shown in the previous image) and then the path to the current “broken” assembly (also with the file name).

 

Conclusion


Altering the context of a parametric model can occur in different ways. It is always recommended to use the revision manager and its ‘where used’ command when moving or copying projects or libraries in order to prevent this kind of damage. Nevertheless, mistakes happen and it is nice to have an easy tool to repair parametric links.

How to: 3D Sketching

Manny Marquez - Thursday, October 23, 2014

Check out our newest youtube video on 3D sketching.

 

View our collection of youtube tutorials and other videos here .

 

 

New Template control in ST7

John Pearson - Monday, October 20, 2014

Many of you have received the new ST7 version of Solid Edge. With over 1300 customer requests addressed, in this new release, I feel it’s worth covering the highlights over the next few blog articles. We also offer a “What’s new in ST7” course, for those of you who prefer a more instructed hands-on approach.

I’d like to start with the new template control. When you launch ST7, you’ll notice the newly designed startup screen.



Notice the list of default templates. These templates are populated based on the standards selected in the initial installation. In previous versions it has been a tedious process to change the standard of the default templates. The template folder and template control mechanism has been restructured to make this much easier. Let’s explore this new mechanism.

From the startup screen, click the Edit List link.



Notice that the new Template List Creation dialog appears.



From the Standard Template column, on the left hand side, select the ANSI Inch standard.


Click OK, and notice that the default templates have been updated to the ANSI Inch standard.



This new approach allows for users to set and change their own template standards, regardless of the initial setup standards.

For you users, that may have existing custom templates, it’s very easy to reuse them with this new mechanism. Simply tell Solid Edge where your custom template folder resides. This is the same process as in previous versions. Bring up the Solid Edge Options > File Locations tab.


Select the User templates header and click the Modify button.



Browse to where your custom template folder resides, in your data base. In this example I’m using a “My custom templates” folder.



Click OK to accept the folder location. Then click OK to close the Solid Edge Option dialog.



Notice that the startup screen now contains my custom templates. If you click on the Edit List link again, you’ll notice that the User Templates have been added to the left column, above the Standard Templates.



Again, this new approach allows for users to set and change between their own template standards, including custom templates, regardless of the initial setup standards.

Another new option is the ability to mix templates into a custom list. Suppose that your job requires you to create a series of mechanical drawings. You could create a custom list of different draft templates to allow you to select different standards directly from the startup screen.

To set this up, click on the Edit List link. At the bottom of the Template List Creation dialog, click the create new list button.



In the List name field, type in Draft Templates.



Click OK, and notice that the Draft Templates header is added under a Custom Templates header.



Using the Browse button, located beside the Add Template field, browse to the ANSI Inch Templates and select the “ansi inch draft.dft” file



Click OK. In the Displayed name field, type in ANSI Inch Draft and click the Add button. Notice that you can also add a description if you wish.



Repeat this step and add as many draft templates that you will need. In this example I added the following Draft templates:

o ANSI Metric Draft

o DIN Metric Draft

o ISO Metric Draft



Click OK. Notice the list has been added to the Startup screen.



Click on the Edit List link again. Notice the other options at the bottom of the dialog.



1. You can rename a list.

2. You can delete a list.

3. You can save a list without having it appear on the startup screen.

Even with the creation of a list, you can always switch back to other standards as your need requires.

This is just one of the many useful and time saving enhancements in Solid Edge ST7. If you’d like to learn more, feel free to contact us sales@designfusion.com, or attend one of our upcoming “What’s new in ST7” courses.

Join us at the annual New York State Regional Users Group meeting

John Pearson - Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Designfusion is proud to be a sponsor and major contributor to this year’s New York State RUG meeting. This year’s meeting will be held at the RIT Inn & Conference Center in Rochester NY, on October 7, 2014. All users are invited, even those who live outside of New York State. Designfusion will be presenting at 8 of the 35 planned seminars.  Our focus this year is Solid Edge and Teamcenter Administration, however there are plenty of other presentations for all attending, as you can see from the agenda below.

 

 

 

Not only is this a great learning opportunity, but it’s also a chance to meet and network with other users and some of the people who support your Siemens’ PLM software.


There is a small fee to attend this event, and you must register in advance. You can do this online at http://www.plmworld.org/new_yorkrugevent.  This site will provide you with all the details of the conference and directions to RIT Inn &

Conference Center. We hope to see you there, and don’t forget to drop by the Designfusion booth in the sponsor’s area.