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Solid Edge: A baker’s dozen of Tips and Tricks (Part 3 of 3)

John Pearson - Friday, August 07, 2015

 

  • 9.Configurations for draft
  •  

Much like you create a configuration for your exploded view, you can create configurations for later use in your draft views. To do this you need to first turn off all the components that you wish to exclude from the view. Then create a new configuration of the components you want to show in the draft view. To do this, select the configuration command:

 


 

Click on the New button.

 


 

Enter in the name of this new configuration.

 


 

You can later place this named configuration as a separate view onto a draft sheet.

 

  • 10.Placing configurations in Draft
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When placing an assembly into a draft sheet, using the Drawing View Wizard, you can select from a list of configurations or zones.

 


 

Only the components in that configuration will be visible in the draft view.

 

Note:If you wish to create a parts list of this configuration, you can set the Part List to only show the configuration components. To do this, open the properties of the Parts List and go to the List Control tab. Notice the Configuration option half way down the right side. Expand this and select the desired configuration.

 


 

  • 11.Placing section views in Draft
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To place an assembly section view into a draft view, you must first place the assembly into the view. You then right click on to view and go to the view properties. On the Section tab you will find a list of all the assembly section views. Simply select the desired section view and then update the views to convert the assembly view into the section view.

 


 

  • 12.Drawing View Depth
  •  

By specifying a drawing view display depth for a back clipping plane, you can simplify any type of drawing view so that geometry behind the plane is removed from the view. This feature can be used, for example, to reduce the visible clutter behind a section view or a broken-out section view.

 

The Set Drawing View Depth command is found on the shortcut menu when you RMB click on the view.

 


 

You can type in a back clipping plane depth or use the companion view to set a depth.

 


 

You can remove the drawing view depth by using the Remove defined Depth command on the shortcut menu.

 

  • 13.Dimension Automatic Arrangement

 

Use the Arrange Dimensions command to automatically group, select, and arrange linear dimensions so they don’t overlap drawing view geometry and annotations.

 


 

There are three different ways to arrange dimensions;


  • I.Select a dimension

 


 

  • II.Fence select – drag a fence around the dimensions

 


 

  • III.Select a drawing view will select all dimensions for that view.

 


 

Note:This automatic arrangement command now makes it easy for you to use the Retrieve Dimensions command and quickly arrange the retrieved dimensions.

Thus ends our baker’s dozen tips and tricks. If all or most of these are new to you, consider upgrading your skills by attending one of our training courses. Here’s the link to the standard courses we offer; http://www.designfusion.ca//technical-training.html. We can also arrange custom training to meet your company’s needs. For more information contact your Account Rep or contact us at info@designfusion.com

 


How to: 3D Sketching

Manny Marquez - Thursday, October 23, 2014

Check out our newest youtube video on 3D sketching.

 

View our collection of youtube tutorials and other videos here .

 

 

New Template control in ST7

John Pearson - Monday, October 20, 2014

Many of you have received the new ST7 version of Solid Edge. With over 1300 customer requests addressed, in this new release, I feel it’s worth covering the highlights over the next few blog articles. We also offer a “What’s new in ST7” course, for those of you who prefer a more instructed hands-on approach.

I’d like to start with the new template control. When you launch ST7, you’ll notice the newly designed startup screen.



Notice the list of default templates. These templates are populated based on the standards selected in the initial installation. In previous versions it has been a tedious process to change the standard of the default templates. The template folder and template control mechanism has been restructured to make this much easier. Let’s explore this new mechanism.

From the startup screen, click the Edit List link.



Notice that the new Template List Creation dialog appears.



From the Standard Template column, on the left hand side, select the ANSI Inch standard.


Click OK, and notice that the default templates have been updated to the ANSI Inch standard.



This new approach allows for users to set and change their own template standards, regardless of the initial setup standards.

For you users, that may have existing custom templates, it’s very easy to reuse them with this new mechanism. Simply tell Solid Edge where your custom template folder resides. This is the same process as in previous versions. Bring up the Solid Edge Options > File Locations tab.


Select the User templates header and click the Modify button.



Browse to where your custom template folder resides, in your data base. In this example I’m using a “My custom templates” folder.



Click OK to accept the folder location. Then click OK to close the Solid Edge Option dialog.



Notice that the startup screen now contains my custom templates. If you click on the Edit List link again, you’ll notice that the User Templates have been added to the left column, above the Standard Templates.



Again, this new approach allows for users to set and change between their own template standards, including custom templates, regardless of the initial setup standards.

Another new option is the ability to mix templates into a custom list. Suppose that your job requires you to create a series of mechanical drawings. You could create a custom list of different draft templates to allow you to select different standards directly from the startup screen.

To set this up, click on the Edit List link. At the bottom of the Template List Creation dialog, click the create new list button.



In the List name field, type in Draft Templates.



Click OK, and notice that the Draft Templates header is added under a Custom Templates header.



Using the Browse button, located beside the Add Template field, browse to the ANSI Inch Templates and select the “ansi inch draft.dft” file



Click OK. In the Displayed name field, type in ANSI Inch Draft and click the Add button. Notice that you can also add a description if you wish.



Repeat this step and add as many draft templates that you will need. In this example I added the following Draft templates:

o ANSI Metric Draft

o DIN Metric Draft

o ISO Metric Draft



Click OK. Notice the list has been added to the Startup screen.



Click on the Edit List link again. Notice the other options at the bottom of the dialog.



1. You can rename a list.

2. You can delete a list.

3. You can save a list without having it appear on the startup screen.

Even with the creation of a list, you can always switch back to other standards as your need requires.

This is just one of the many useful and time saving enhancements in Solid Edge ST7. If you’d like to learn more, feel free to contact us sales@designfusion.com, or attend one of our upcoming “What’s new in ST7” courses.

Solid Edge ST7 Addresses the User's Needs

John Pearson - Sunday, June 01, 2014
Over the years I have seen 14 launches of new versions of Solid Edge. Although each release has always added new and powerful features, there are certain releases that really stand out for me. Solid Edge ST7 is one of those releases. This release has added some long overdue functionality that users have been requesting for years. Many users at the recent SEU2014 commented on how great it will be to utilize these new tools, and how beneficial they will be to their overall design process. In this article I’d like to highlight my top 5 most requested enhancements which have been added to Solid Edge ST7.

1) For years I, and many other users, have been requesting a 3D sketching tool. Yes you can create 3D sketches in older versions, but to be efficient you needed to understand how to use the surfacing and curve tools. Solid Edge ST7 finally introduces 3D Sketching. This functionality combines the 3D path creation tool from XpresRoute along with standard sketching commands, to create a very efficient tool to create your 3D sketches. In Synchronous Part and Sheet Metal environments you will see a new 3D Sketching tab.


In the Ordered Part, Sheet Metal, and Assembly environments, a new 3D Sketch command has been added. This command will launch you into a new 3D Sketch mode.



The new 3D sketching will greatly simplify the ability to define paths for sweep operations (as shown below), plus piping and tubing routes, and wire paths.


2) Along with the 3D Sketching, Solid Edge ST7 has added a ‘Fixed Length Curve’ functionality. This allows a curve to stay at a specified length when the location of either end, or the curve path, is changed. This is ideal for flexible hoses or cables of a fixed length.


3) Another long requested enhancement has been the ability to flatten deformation features. Solid Edge ST7 now allows users to create a blank from any 3D model.


The blank is created with the newly added Blank Body command and is available when you are in the Flatten command.


With accuracy control, and several other options, the new Blank Body command provides flatten capabilities that were only previously available through third party packages costing thousands of dollars. This however is not an add-on. It is included with all Classic and Premium licenses.

4) In Solid Edge ST7 they have revamped the measuring tools. Users have complained about the measuring tools for as long as I can remember. This new look provides more intuitive commands and more control over what you are measuring. You can also save some of the results as variables, or cut and paste results from the information dialog box into other command fields. Although this may seem a trivial enhancement, it should prove to be a welcome one for those users who have to do a lot of measuring during the design process.

5) Another vastly improved area in Solid Edge ST7 is a new and improved Hole Wizard. The new Hole command now allows extensive, standards-based hole placements. It supports most international standards including DIN, ISO and ANSI, and is comprehensive and consistent across the Part, Sheet Metal, and Assembly environments.


So these are my top enhancements in Solid Edge ST7. I choose these based on my personal requirements and requests from our customers over my last 11 years of working with Solid Edge. As you can imagine there are many other powerful and efficient tools added to Solid Edge ST7. In fact there are over 1300 customer requests addressed in the new release. If you would like more information on ST7 you can download the What’s new in Solid Edge ST7 fact sheet, or contact us at sales@designfusion.com. Although no final date has been confirmed, customers can expect Solid Edge ST7 delivery this summer.